We’re in the midst of the British summertime, which usually consists of both heavy rain, gloomy cloud and the odd bit of sunshine if we’re lucky. However, we’re never afraid of uncovering the trusty barbecue for a meal that’s dedicated to the warmer weather. With glorious food and the pleasure of having friends and family round for the evening, there’s no better atmosphere during the summer. So if you’re planning a barbecue in the future or clearing up after one, you might have realised that the cleaning process is a little more complicated than you’d expected. Here are a few barbecue cleaning tips to prolong your beloved cooking alternative.

There are plenty of products available on the net that are ideal for cleaning barbecue grates, so you can essentially take your pick. Remember that grates ultimately contribute to the flavour of the food, so they have to be left in good shape once a barbecue is over. The tool you need to get rid of all the fat and remaining food particles is a wire brush, as this ahs the strength and capabilities to clean thoroughly between grates. Make sure the solution you use with the wire brush is warm and soapy for improved results.

If you’re using a gas grill, you need to make sure you always clean it after every use. Many gas grills actually have their own unique setting marked ‘clean’, which you can use to preheat it for cleaning. However, this doesn’t actually clean it properly, so you’ll need to apply your own cleaning techniques to make sure it’s spotless. You can clean the grates in the same way as you would with a standard barbecue.

For charcoal grills, you’ll need the handy wire brush once more. Despite the fact that the ash that builds up in charcoal grills can be easily disposed of, you still need to make sure you clean any leftover food particles with a wire brush. Use a cleaning solution to get rid of any tough grease or food stains at the surface of the charcoal grill, whilst you should also wash the grates thoroughly as mentioned above.

Thorough inspections of any barbecues and grills are advised and you can usually take any kind of grill apart to carry out a detailed inspection. This prevents food from going unnoticed and getting trapped somewhere in the grill, potentially causing future problems.

Written on July 11, 2014 ·